All posts tagged: artisan cheese

A rather lovely day, eating and drinking at Nottingham Castle

I should be a total Food Festival fanatic, and indeed I probably am. Certainly, the daughter rolls her eyes to the heavens whenever we are about to plan a weekend foray to one. Well, actually, I don’t think I am fanatical about anything, but I do, or rather did, rather enjoy festivals. So many have sprung up over recent years though, and I have suffered so many expensive disappointments that I am much more discerning about where I will go and what I am prepared to pay. It is simply not good enough to charge people entry, and/or charge them to park their cars (in places where there is no alternative means of getting there) and then present them with a handful of pickle sellers and someone making 3D cards.    However, the Nottingham Festival of Food and Drink has joined the likes of the Melton Mowbray Food Festival in the “yes this is well worth a visit category”. So we headed over to the Castle on what promised to be (and eventually became) a …

Food Festival Porn in Melton Mowbray

As you know, I love a good food festival. The trouble is, so few of them are, in fact, any good. Almost every weekend there is a food festival somewhere, I don’t mean Farmer’s Markets or Food Markets, but events described as “food festivals” and usually held in some rather nice location, an old Market Square, a stately home, a country park, a lakeside location. Each one that appears on my social media, lures me in with promises of artisan foods and new foodie treats. I find it hard to resist, and I have been to loads. A lot of them are, though, pretty rubbish. I know it takes time for things to become established, for audiences to build up and for traders to think it worth their while, but still, Food Festivals that charge £6, £8 per head before you can enter to spend more money, and/or are in the middle of nowhere (petrol money, bus fares) and only have 6/7 stalls with traders who resent giving out samples, really, really annoy me. You …

Kiss-Me-Quick Hats, Rock, Chips, Donkey-rides? Nope, Artisan Cheese.

I love cheese and this weekend I discovered a new cheese. Well, it’s not that new, I know it won an award in 2012, but that is still pretty new as far as cheeses go and definitely new to me. It is local, made near the Lincolnshire Coast in a small village in East Lindsay –  Thorpe St Peter –  a stone’s throw from the very traditional British holiday resort of Skegness. Skegness is famous for many things – and for those of us who have grown up in the East Midlands or Yorkshire it has probably been one of our regular day-trip destinations since childhood (I have a photo of my Great Grandmother walking arm in arm along the front from 1931!) The long stretches of sand, the donkey-rides, the “Pleasure Beach”, winkles, cockles, buckets and spades, “Kiss-me -Quick” Hats, End of the Pier shows, sticks of rock, the Illuminations and hot chips burning your mouth on a breezy walk along the prom, bring back happy childhood memories for many of us in this …

A Year in Cheese – Autumn. A Lincolnshire Poacher and an aged Gruyère

I love cheese. I love gin as well, but I particularly love cheese. I treated myself recently to the Guarneri Brothers (of London Fromagerie, Androuet) book “A Year in Cheese” which explores the seasonality of cheeses, suggests a cheese plate for each changing season and is illustrated with wonderful, quirky and innovative recipes to make the most of the cheeses (by Alessandro Grand). The East Midlands produces some wonderful cheeses, as indeed does England, indeed the British Isles is awash with wonderful cheeses and the increase in seasonality, regionality and artisan production means that the choice, variety and quality must surely never have been higher. So I have set myself a challenge, to explore our seasonal cheeses, inspired by the Guarneri Brothers’ book (well, that is my excuse). So  – why seasonal cheeses? Cheese is like wine, there are endless varieties, nuances of flavour, changes with age, the earth the vines are grown in, the type of grape, the weather, the geography and topography, the texture (ok wine is clearly “wet” but you get my …