All posts tagged: cooking apple

Stubble Goose and Sour Blackberries – Devil Spits Day

He who eats goose on Michaelmas day Shan’t money lack or  have debts to pay. [Old English Saying] Nottingham is rightly famous for its Goose Fair which takes place at the beginning of October each year. Its story extends at least some 700 years back into history. Goose Fairs were held around Michaelmas (29th September) when the harvest was over and the Geese were starting to fatten up picking grain left amongst the stubble in the fields. A “Stubble Goose” was a traditional feast dish for Michaelmas (in Christianity the Feast of St Michael the Archangel, marking the beginning of Autumn and the last day, according to Folklore, on which Blackberries should be picked). The carcass of the Goose was then used for making Michaelmas Broth. Story tells that thousands of  Geese were driven from Lincolnshire and Norfolk to be sold in Nottingham, in the old Market Square and that this is the origin of the modern fair, which sadly no longer sells geese,  but is now one of the largest (and oldest) travelling fairs …

“Apple-In-and-Out” or Nottingham Pudding

The Bramley Apple, the unassailed Queen of the cooking apple, is said to originate in Nottinghamshire. The story tells that a young girl planted some wild pips in her back garden in Southwell, and that the ensuing tree was the first Bramley  – from which all other Bramley trees orginate. That original tree still stands, I am told, and there is a stained-glass window in Southwell Minster to commemorate this most English of apples. (I really must check this out!). We had two huge Bramley apple trees, dating from Victorian times, in our garden as a child. One was lost to a great storm around 1977, the other still stands today. My father picked every last apple from those trees (and there were hundreds…)  every Autumn and Bramleys are always in my memories of childhood meals. Nottingham Pudding It is said that Nottingham Pudding dates back to medieval times, when this satisfying mix of batter, fruit and spices frequently accompanied roast meats.  Given our central place in England’s geography and the though-flow of people from …