All posts tagged: Newark

Is it baked? Yes, well, we bake it first, then microwave it.

Good Grief. Ok, I am going to share this tale with you. On the way back from Lincoln to Nottingham yesterday, I persuaded the husband to stop off at The Friendly Farmer on the A46 just before Newark. I say persuaded as he was rather sceptical about a cafe cum farm shop on a major roundabout next to a dual carriageway. But is was lunchtime and we were starving. We parked up and things were not altogether promising. The whole prospect was slightly shabby. A group was sat smoking at a picnic table at the front of the shop right by the entrance (smoke away by all means, but it isn’t the best welcome for a non-smoker looking for lunch), the front doors are distinctly grubby and in need of a serious spruce up and a coat of paint. Inside the large space is part cafe and then a sort of higgedly piggedly mix of farm shop and butcher. We walked up to the counter, which had an array of bain maries keeping food warm …

Newark Show “Cut and Butter” Cake

It is told that the illustrious, and slightly scary sounding, Nottinghamshire Women’s Institute Catering Committee devised this fruit loaf for the Notts County Show held at the Newark Showground every May. I don’t have any dates for this recipe, it appears in Angela Greary’s 1994 local recipes book and follows a similar fruitcake recipe from Southwell, dated 1890. However, it is clearly a very traditional and, indeed, a very simple recipe. Given the array of food choices and exotic street food that characterise so many shows and festivals nowadays (not that I am complaining, you understand ūüėä) ¬†it is nice to think that such a simple and traditional tea loaf was the talk of the show. Apparently it was sold in the refreshment tent, sliced and buttered (hence the name) and was always a popular choice. This recipe (in post-Brexit Imperial measures, I’m afraid) ¬†makes two solid loaves or cakes (put one in the freezer or store in an airtight tin). Ingredients ¬†1 and a half lbs mixed dried fruit, 3/4 pint hot tea (or …

Newark Pudding circa 1890, by “Good Housewives and Competent Cooks”

Bread Puddings exist in many culinary traditions. Most people would recognise, and love, a good Bread and Butter Pudding, essentially layers of sliced bread scattered with raisins and then covered in a custard of milk, eggs and sugar, possibly with nutmeg, and baked in the oven. The earliest bread and butter puddings were called “whitepots” and often contained suet rather than butter, and sometimes rice instead of bread (rice puddings – another great British staple) and any combination of fruits – currants, raisins, lemon zest, apples. One of the earliest recipes appeared in 1723 but variations of this have probably been around forever. Food historians have traced examples of bread puddings dating back to the 11th and 12th century (probably as a way to use up stale bread) and, stale bread soaked in water and flavoured with a little sugar was often known as “poor man’s pudding”. Most regions of England have their own version of such puddings, this one is “Newark Pudding”. The settlement of Newark, a large market town about 20 miles from …