All posts tagged: recipe

Chicken Gyros, my version

I love a good gyro, they put me in mind of the so many wonderful, heady Greek and Cypriot holidays of my youth. I’m always at the front of the queue at the gyros stand at food markets and fairs (chuntering about the entry price usually). So, here’s my simple recipe (well if you buy the flatbreads or pitta rather than make your own, its simple) for a chicken version, as requested via my Twitterfam. No photo of the finished delight as we ate them and forgot to photograph them (blogging schoolboy error, there). All the amounts are only guides as I basically just threw the spices in. This works really well on the bbq as well. Ingredients: – 8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs (sliced lengthways into thirds) For the marinade:- 4 tablespoons olive oil then according to taste, (roughly twice the amount as the other spices though) dried oregano, then ground cumin, coriander (dried or fresh), sweet paprika, small bunch of chopped fresh mint, zest and juice 1 lemon, 4 crushed garlic cloves, pinch of cayenne, generous seasoning with …

Newark Show “Cut and Butter” Cake

It is told that the illustrious, and slightly scary sounding, Nottinghamshire Women’s Institute Catering Committee devised this fruit loaf for the Notts County Show held at the Newark Showground every May. I don’t have any dates for this recipe, it appears in Angela Greary’s 1994 local recipes book and follows a similar fruitcake recipe from Southwell, dated 1890. However, it is clearly a very traditional and, indeed, a very simple recipe. Given the array of food choices and exotic street food that characterise so many shows and festivals nowadays (not that I am complaining, you understand 😊)  it is nice to think that such a simple and traditional tea loaf was the talk of the show. Apparently it was sold in the refreshment tent, sliced and buttered (hence the name) and was always a popular choice. This recipe (in post-Brexit Imperial measures, I’m afraid)  makes two solid loaves or cakes (put one in the freezer or store in an airtight tin). Ingredients  1 and a half lbs mixed dried fruit, 3/4 pint hot tea (or …

Pudla by Popular Demand

I made these for supper the other evening and posted the pictures on Twitter. Quite a few people asked for the recipe – so here you are. It is simple to make but a bit of a fiddle. I adapted this from a recipe by Anna Jones in The Dish. Pudla (chickpea pancakes)  – 1 green chilli (finely chopped), Half teaspoon ground coriander, half teaspoon turmeric, small bunch of fresh coriander, roughly chopped, fresh ginger (around thumb-sized) peeled and grated, 250g gram flour. Filling – 1 tablespoons toasted mustard seeds, 1 small butternut squash (grated), 3 spring onions (finely sliced), 3 cloves garlic, finely sliced, half a red chilli, thinly sliced, thumb-sized pice of ginger (peeled and grated) 2 tsp garam masala, sea salt, 150g Paneer cheese, large handful of baby spinach. I also threw in about half a teaspoon of hot “curry powder” that was in my cupboard. To serve – 1 lemon, small bunch of coriander leaves, sliced red chillies, mango chutney, yoghurt. Place all the Pudla ingredients in a blender and blitz …

Backyard Pizza Oven – finally!

I have dreamt of a pizza oven in our back garden for years. I placed it on the husband’s “to do” list about 10 years ago. Every time, here or abroad, I spotted a traditional wood-burning pizza oven I would drop unsubtle hints and be promised one for the following summer. In the end, with no sign of the pizza oven materialising, I changed tack and put the Finnish-designed Uuni 2 wood-fired oven on my Christmas list. Yep, my Christmas list. That’ll throw him, I thought. So finally this weekend was warm enough to get my pizza oven out and learn how to drive it. It isn’t the home-made traditional oven I had originally envisaged, but this is nonetheless a thing of beauty and, finally, I have a pizza oven in the back garden. My first attempts were simple – home-made pizza dough with a tomato base, mozzarella, few chillies, Italian salami and fresh basil, some with a few peppers. It took a bit of mastering to get the flames inside large enough to ensure …

Ham Croquetas, is life too short?

I love Croquetas, or croquettes  – if you prefer. They do have that unbeatable mouthfeel thing don’t they? Crispy and crunchy on the outside, hot and creamy inside – an essential addition to your tapas. I have not yet found a shop-bought version that gives you same hit so when I spotted this recipe by José Pizarro in the BBC Good Food magazine. I thought, why not? I can tell you why not…..because they are right fiddle. Delicious, but a time-consuming, right fiddle. Ingredients 75g Plain Flour, 2 large eggs (beaten), 75g breadcrumbs (I used Panko breadcrumbs) For the filling – 4 tablespoons olive oil, 1 small leek very finely diced, 70g Iberico ham (or similar, I used Serrano), 60g plain flour, 75ml ham or veg stock (I used new Oxo Ham stock – fab), 325ml full fat milk, freshly grated nutmeg to taste (I kept it light) Method For the filling, heat the olive oil in a pan until fairly warm, add the leek and sauté until soft, but not browned. Stir in the …

Field to Pot….Slow Roast Lamb

The fields around the house are bucolic at the moment, the sun is out in the English Spring, and the lambs are skipping around, racing each other and bleating madly. It’s like an episode of the Archers, but without the domestic violence. Spring lambs are a joy to behold, but, now be strong, they are only there enjoying the sun because we eat them . This 4 hour pot roast with red wine, chunky carrots, onions and courgettes, Rosemary, garlic and stock, was devine.

Springtime, Easter & Chocolate, what’s not to like?

The daffodils are out, blossom buds are appearing on the Flowering Cherry trees in the garden and Easter is coming…..one of my favourite holidays. Lamb will be on the menu, along with….chocolate …..of course. Apparently people have been enjoying chocolate for over 4000 years and rumour has it that the 16th Century Aztec Emperor Montezuma drank around 3 gallons a day of liquid chocolate as he believed the bitter beverage to be an aphrodisiac.. I can’t claim that these recipes will turn you on 🙈 but NG Magazines asked me to share some simple delicious chocolate recipes for Easter and here they are. Seriously Easy Chocolate Truffles This recipe makes a lot of Truffles (about 60), you can halve the ingredients if you prefer, or make loads, vary the flavourings and coatings and give as a special gift. 200g Cream Cheese, softened 350g icing sugar, sifted 500g plain chocolate (melted slowly in a heat-proof bowl over simmering hot water) 1 1/2 teaspoons of vanilla essence Beat cream cheese in a large bowl until smooth. Gradually beat in …

Khinkali – It’s December, surely it is time for dumplings?

I loved the time I spent in Finland in my late teens and the travelling I did in Karelia and Russia (then the Soviet Union – yep I’m that old) and in particular I loved the various types of “dumplings” that varied between regions and countries but which all had in common the ability to fill you up and warm you up in the very cold Northern winters. It’s not so cold here in Nottinghamshire, in fact, this December must be heading for some sort of record as it was 12 degrees celsius at 7am this morning and the day-time temps rose to 17 degrees celsius yesterday which is, bizarrely, like June. Still, can’t let that get in the way of winter cooking, so here is a version of a Georgian dumpling, known as Khinkali, they are similar to (but as the locals will tell you) nonetheless different from Polish Pierogi or Russian Pelmeni. I can’t vouch for the authenticity of this as it was taught to me so long ago I may have amended …

Aw Shucks, do you swallow or chew? Oyster season is upon us……

I know, I know, sorry. But, hey there is an “r” in the month and, love them or hate them, the oyster season has started and I can’t help but get a bit giddy. I am a big oyster fan, so I thought I would dedicate this short piece to the briny, slimy, tasty and expensive joys of new season oysters. So, in the best tradition of food blogging –  here are 6 things you may or may not know about oysters  (“pearls” of wisdom, you may say):- 1 There are only 5 main types of Oyster, but there are 100s of varieties and their shell, shape and flavour change mostly according to the very specific area and type of water they inhabit. Oysters are always “local”. If you are in the UK, go for Native if you can, rather than Rock (but both are good). Most types of Oyster (apart from deep sea ones) don’t make pearls. I know, bugger isn’t it? 2 I am an “ostreaphile” – an oyster lover. Get me. 3 …