All posts tagged: seasons

A Year in Cheese – Autumn. A Lincolnshire Poacher and an aged Gruyère

I love cheese. I love gin as well, but I particularly love cheese. I treated myself recently to the Guarneri Brothers (of London Fromagerie, Androuet) book “A Year in Cheese” which explores the seasonality of cheeses, suggests a cheese plate for each changing season and is illustrated with wonderful, quirky and innovative recipes to make the most of the cheeses (by Alessandro Grand). The East Midlands produces some wonderful cheeses, as indeed does England, indeed the British Isles is awash with wonderful cheeses and the increase in seasonality, regionality and artisan production means that the choice, variety and quality must surely never have been higher. So I have set myself a challenge, to explore our seasonal cheeses, inspired by the Guarneri Brothers’ book (well, that is my excuse). So  – why seasonal cheeses? Cheese is like wine, there are endless varieties, nuances of flavour, changes with age, the earth the vines are grown in, the type of grape, the weather, the geography and topography, the texture (ok wine is clearly “wet” but you get my …

Aw Shucks, do you swallow or chew? Oyster season is upon us……

I know, I know, sorry. But, hey there is an “r” in the month and, love them or hate them, the oyster season has started and I can’t help but get a bit giddy. I am a big oyster fan, so I thought I would dedicate this short piece to the briny, slimy, tasty and expensive joys of new season oysters. So, in the best tradition of food blogging –  here are 6 things you may or may not know about oysters  (“pearls” of wisdom, you may say):- 1 There are only 5 main types of Oyster, but there are 100s of varieties and their shell, shape and flavour change mostly according to the very specific area and type of water they inhabit. Oysters are always “local”. If you are in the UK, go for Native if you can, rather than Rock (but both are good). Most types of Oyster (apart from deep sea ones) don’t make pearls. I know, bugger isn’t it? 2 I am an “ostreaphile” – an oyster lover. Get me. 3 …