All posts tagged: Southwell Minster

A Festival of Apples, well, just the one Apple, really.

A festival celebrating an Apple Last weekend saw the annual Bramley Apple Festival, held in Southwell and centred on the wonderful Minster. This has been going for as long as I can recall but I have never managed to get along, despite my love of the Bramley. Prompted by a comment on this blog by Celia Steven (née Merryweather), we took a drive over on a very grey and miserable Sunday morning. The story goes that in 1809 Mary Anne Brailsford planted a wild pip in the garden of her cottage in Southwell. From this pip grew an apple tree, which still stands today some 200 years later. Mathew Bramley who later bought the cottage gave Henry Merryweather the rights to sell the apple commercially (as long as it retained his name). The Bramley is probably now the queen of cooking apples, is the basis of many local puddings, ciders and pies, and I have a box of them  right now in my garage, hand-picked by my father from his Victorian, and still glorious, tree. …

“Apple-In-and-Out” or Nottingham Pudding

The Bramley Apple, the unassailed Queen of the cooking apple, is said to originate in Nottinghamshire. The story tells that a young girl planted some wild pips in her back garden in Southwell, and that the ensuing tree was the first Bramley  – from which all other Bramley trees orginate. That original tree still stands, I am told, and there is a stained-glass window in Southwell Minster to commemorate this most English of apples. (I really must check this out!). We had two huge Bramley apple trees, dating from Victorian times, in our garden as a child. One was lost to a great storm around 1977, the other still stands today. My father picked every last apple from those trees (and there were hundreds…)  every Autumn and Bramleys are always in my memories of childhood meals. Nottingham Pudding It is said that Nottingham Pudding dates back to medieval times, when this satisfying mix of batter, fruit and spices frequently accompanied roast meats.  Given our central place in England’s geography and the though-flow of people from …