All posts tagged: Welbeck

Kimchi, Sauerkraut & Pickled Lemons – a day of pickling at the School of Artisan Food

I love the School of Artisan Food in North Nottinghamshire. It is an absolute gem. It is set on the wonderful Welbeck Abbey Estate, the ancestral home of the Dukes of Portland in the heart of the ancient Dukeries. The Estate remains private but is now also home to a number of thriving artisan food businesses (of which more in a later blog) and the superb School. On this occasion I attended for the Great Food Club. Below is a version of the article, which can be found at greatfoodclub.co.uk “Fermentation is, let’s face it, a staging post on the road to rot” so said our tutor for the day, food writer and cook Lindy Wildsmith, as we began a day of Pickling and Fermenting at the fabulous School of Artisan Food. If you don’t know the School, it is situated on the beautiful Welbeck Estate at the heart of Sherwood Forest and is surely is one of the jewels in Nottinghamshire’s culinary crown. Established in 2006, the School is housed in the former Victorian …

Living on the edge, and at my age as well – Raw Milk

Just when you think there is nothing much new under the sun, you discover there is. Well, not new exactly, but you get my drift. I grew up in rural Lincolnshire but, unlike just about everyone who has since contacted me about this, I don’t think I ever drank raw (unpasteurised) milk. I can recall an old fella that used to cycle to the dairy farm every morning with a small metal churn hanging from his handlebars – I now realise what he was up to. I had of course had sterilised milk – which still makes me think nostalgically of early package holidays – you’re still hard pushed to get fresh pasteurised milk in most of southern Europe, but it has taken a fair few years ( I won’t say how many) for the moment to arrive when I finally got to try raw milk. Raw milk is not, of course, without controversy. It cannot be sold in shops or supermarkets, but only at the “farmgate” direct to the consumer by the dairy that …

Food for Thought – a weekend of utter foodiness

Last weekend was all about me. This almost never happens, but last weekend it did. I attended the wonderful School of Artisan Food’s annual food lecture weekend – “Food for Thought”. For those not familiar with this fabulous place, the School is located on the beautiful Welbeck Estate in North Nottinghamshire, it is the ancestral home of the Dukes of Portland, is famous for its tunnels and underground ballroom and is situated at the heart of the Dukeries – the ancient hunting grounds of Royalty and Aristocracy. Not only that, the School is a fantastic resource hosting all kinds of artisan food courses from baking and patisserie to cheese making and artisan ice cream, butchery and cider making. Just a totally fantastic place. Last weekend rolled out some “stars” of the culinary world, to talk with and to a “foodie” audience. I would say it was an eclectic mix – food writers, bloggers, home-cooks, a Vet, retired sorts and young whipperysnappery things up from London with cuboid necklaces and spiral bound notebooks. It was also …

Welbeck Pudding – more batter, more Bramleys…..

Nottinghamshire traditionally had a reputation for excellent batter puddings. Welbeck Pudding is no exception but it is unusual as it features a flour-free batter  (which is a bit like a souffle or meringue topping) with the Nottinghamshire Bramley Apple as its base. What’s not to like? Well, actually, I have slightly altered the original recipe I found as it didn’t work for me with so little milk. Welbeck itself (see my post on the Harley Cafe and Welbeck  Estate) is in North Nottinghamshire and from the 18th Century formed part of the “Dukeries”, the great estates  and Royal hunting grounds around Sherwood Forest owned by 5 Dukes. Welbeck Abbey, home to the Dukes of Portland, is a vast and architecturally complex mansion, with a network of mysterious underground tunnels. It stands on the site of the original Abbey which is thought to date back to 1153. I cannot find any reference to why Welbeck Pudding is named after the House, perhaps one of the cooks developed it as someone in the family had a wheat intolerance (as …

From Mesolithic to Meringues – Cresswell Craggs, Welbeck and the Harley Cafe

Have you discovered the Welbeck Farm Shop and Harley cafe yet? We had a lovely walk from there to the bewitching ice-age lagoon and caves of Cresswell Craggs this week. We ended our walk with lunch at the Harley Cafe and then indulged in the little bit of heaven that is the Welbeck Farm Shop. The Harley Cafe sits in a beautiful courtyard of renovated buildings (including the Gallery which sits in the Welbeck Estate’s restored gasworks, which were originally built in 1860 by the 5th Duke of Portland to light his eccentric network of underground tunnels and apartments. They finally closed in 1928 when the Estate moved over to electricity). The courtyard now beautifully combines the old with the new. We loved the cafe colour scheme, with its deep orange/red and the black wooden outside furniture, modern and minimalist, it contrasts well with the warm hues of the old stonework.           Anyway, the food. The cafe sells a range of delicious -sounding hot dishes, all freshly cooked (and not your usual cafe fare …